Ross School - Senior Projects 2012

 

Student: Oliver Culver

Mentor: Urban Reininger

Domain(s): Science and Graphic Design

Faculty Grader: Carlton Schade

 

 

 

Documentation of Product

 

Title: An Eco Green Life

Description:

For my Senior Project, I designed two houses virtually, using the program Sketch Up, and then created the floor plans for each of them. I contacted a

green” specialist to find out what type of green technology I would need to power the houses. I have always had an interest in architecture but never knew how to pursue an actual project. In the fall of senior year, I took an architecture class with Ned Smyth. My goal for this project was to try and focus society's attention on green design, and to start trying to save our planet, as well as to get an idea of what it would be like if I were to pursue this career in the future.

 

Details:

Description: MacintoshHD:Users:oculver12:Desktop:Senior Project Research:PresentPics:2012-01-09 22.27.34.jpg

Description: MacintoshHD:Users:oculver12:Desktop:Senior Project Research:PresentPics:2012-01-09 23.57.20.jpg

Description: MacintoshHD:Users:oculver12:Desktop:Senior Project Research:PresentPics:2012-01-13 14.52.35.jpg

Description: MacintoshHD:Users:oculver12:Desktop:Senior Project Research:PresentPics:2012-02-08 08.59.21.jpg

Description: MacintoshHD:Users:oculver12:Desktop:Senior Project Research:PresentPics:2012-02-08 09.00.34.jpg

Description: MacintoshHD:Users:oculver12:Desktop:Senior Project Research:PresentPics:Screen shot 2012-02-07 at 10.56.31 PM.png

Description: MacintoshHD:Users:oculver12:Desktop:Senior Project Research:PresentPics:Screen shot 2012-02-07 at 11.27.17 PM.png

 

 

Oliver Powerpoint

Exhibition & Presentation Summary

            When I first started planning my senior project, I knew I wanted to create something where I could learn about Eco-Friendly technology.  I had originally set out to do an urban planning project.  My goal was to re-design a new/Eco-Friendly Fukushima.  The summer entering my senior year, I started to read “Fukushima Meltdown & Modern Radiation: Protecting Ourselves and Our Future Generations” written by John Apsley.  In this book he talks about what Ionizing Radiation will do to us, and what we can do nutritionally to help save ourselves.  He uses the nuclear melt down in Fukushima as an example.  By September, after doing research on the meltdown, I started researching about urban planning, since it was the main objective of the project.  I came to the conclusion that this project would be too hard, and that if I were ever to do this, I would need more time then permitted, so I was forced to change my topic.  Last year, for the modernity project, I rebuilt a three-dimensional model of the “Opera Garnier” in Paris, and studied Haussmann’s influence architecturally on both Paris and the world.  I still knew I wanted to create something involving planning and Eco Green technology as well, so I came up with the idea of designing four houses to each be self reliant using different forces of nature such as wind, solar, and geothermal.  I loved this idea, but had no idea of how to design floor plans for houses, and I had never even looked at one. The only class I had ever taken was a “Virtual Spaces” class where I made a three-dimensional model of the senior building, the art gallery and the basement library of the high school building.   In the fall of senior year, I took an architecture class at Ross with Ned Smyth, which was a minor set back for my product because I was learning with the class, and had to wait until I had even a basic understanding until I could start making floor plans.  During this time, I started thinking of the design of the houses, and knew I wanted to make modern style architecture like that of Mies Van Der Rohe and Walter Gropius.  I started to design two houses until I realized one day in architecture class created four floor plans would be again way to hard.  My new goal was to create two floor plans to go along with the three-dimensional models I had already created and both of these houses were going to be designed for the East End of Long Island.  One house was going to be powered by wind, and the other to be powered by the sun.  At this point I continued to focus on wind turbine technology, but what I came to realize is that with wind turbines you would not get as much power as if someone were to use solar technology especially out here.  This time I decided to use my two houses, and have them both use solar technology.

            When I finished my floor plans, it was hard to find how much power I would need for both my houses, so I contacted “Go Solar” which is a Long Island solar provider, because they would give me an approximate cost/benefit analysis.  We scheduled to meet and they were more than helpful with giving me both suggestions and insight into what there is to know, giving me models to use, how many Kilo-Watts I would need to power the houses, and also insight into what LIPA (Long Island Power Authority) could provide.

When I was creating my first house’s model, I didn’t abide by the “Form equals function” rule, and I built the house with a flat roof.  At first I thought this would be a problem since solar panels function better on an angle.   What I had found out is that there is a racking system for flat roofs.  For this house to make the angle, there is a company called “RapidRac”, which will put the solar panels on a fifteen-degree angle.  As for the solar panels, the house will be powered by forty-five “Sanyo” panels, three rows of fifteen panels.  “Sanyo” is one of the best solar brands out today, what makes them so great is that their cell structure is different then many other brands.  This “HIT Power 220A” which is the model I am using, will be able to generate nine thousand nine hundred watts.

            As for the specifications for the house, these solar panels will generate about ninety one percent of the power needed for the house, and “LIPA” would have to do the rest.  Electricity usage is measured in KWH (Kilowatt-hours) and the higher the PV (Photovoltaic) modules the more KWH we can generate. 

Go Solar Predicted This house’s estimated annual savings would be $2,568.00, which is determined by LIPA’s current electric rate.   The total system cost for these units would be $52,926 without a battery back up, but LIPA will give a rebate of $17,500, the state will give $5,000, and you will also get a federal tax credit of $10,500, so the cost after applicable incentives would $19,798.

If we were to use a battery back up for this house the total system cost for these units would be $64,925, and as stated before LIPA will give a rebate of $17,500, the state will give $5,000, and you will also get a federal tax credit of $10,500, so the cost after applicable incentives would $28,198.

As for the inverters, which convert the DC electricity into useable electricity, there are two different brands depending on whether we want to use a back up battery.       

When I was creating the second house, I had learned to let the form of the house be it’s function, on the roof of this house I created it so that there is a fifteen degree slant facing the south, so that the solar panels could be put there with no difficulty and facing the south because that is where we get the peak hours of sunlight per day.   This house will be using the “Sanyo HIT Power 220A” Modules.  Since the slant of the roof is twenty-one feet long and it is thirty-two feet wide with a fifteen-degree angle we would be able to fit four rows of twelve panels, meaning we can get forty-eight panels of the 220A modules.  This house will generate an estimated 13,500 KWH of yearly usage.   

        As for the specifications for the house, these solar panels will generate about ninety one percent of the power needed for the house, and “LIPA” would have to do the rest.  Electricity usage is measured in KWH (Kilowatt-hours) and the higher the PV (Photovoltaic) modules the more KWH we can generate. 

Go Solar Predicted that at LIPA’s current electric rate, the estimated annual savings for this house would be $2,883. The total system cost for these units would be $55,408 without a battery back up, but LIPA will give a rebate of $17,000, the state will give $5,000, and you will also get a federal tax credit of $11,372, so the cost after applicable incentives would $21,536.

If we were to use a battery back up for this house the total system cost for these units would be $67,408, and as stated before LIPA will give a rebate of $17,500, the state will give $5,000, and you will also get a federal tax credit of $14,972, so the cost after applicable incentives would $29,936.

As for the inverters, which convert the DC electricity into useable electricity, there are two different brands depending on whether we want to use a back up battery.   If we were going to use a Back up battery we would need to of the “Xantrex XW – Hybrid inverters” and this would allow us to be completely off the grid, but that’s not necessarily a good thing because for all the excess power that our modules generate, LIPA will pay us $.21/KWH and if we were “off-grid” we wouldn’t be getting paid for the power waste.    If we were not going to be using the Back up battery then we would use an “Aurora PVI-5000-TL-OUTD” module made by “Power One” The panels will still generate one hundred percent of the needed power but we would need a tie to LIPA.

             

During the process of my project, I learned what I originally intended to learn.  I learned how to design and construct buildings.

I learned about Eco-Green technology while learning about how to implement the technology into the structure my buildings.  

I also learned about different styles of Architecture and what makes them significant.  Even though my final product wasn’t what I had originally intended, I am very pround of how my final product turned out, and wish to continute this study though college and hopefully as a career in the future.

 

 

 

Bibliography or Works Consulted

                                                             Works Cited

 

"architecture." Encyclopĺdia Britannica. Encyclopĺdia Britannica Online School Edition.

            Encyclopĺdia Britannica, Inc., 2012. Web. 25 Jan. 2012.

<http://www.school.eb.com/eb/article-9110410>.

"3M Residential Window Films - Solar Tech Glass Tinting | 3M Prestige Window Film Dealer | Memphis, TN." Home - Solar Tech Glass Tinting | 3M Prestige Window Film Dealer | Memphis, TN. 13 Oct. 2011. Web. 25 Dec. 2012. <http://solartechglasstinting.com/3m-residential-window-films/3m-residential-window-films.html>.

"Astrum Solar Calculator | Get Real Pricing." Astrum Solar | Expert Home Solar Panels Installer. Astrum Solar. Web. 25 Nov. 2012. <http://www.astrumsolar.com/calculator/start>.

Batteries, Rechargeable. "HowStuffWorks "How Solar Cells Work"" HowStuffWorks "Science" Web. 25 Dec. 2012. <http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/solar-cell.htm>.

Colquhoun, Alan. Modern Architecture. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. Print.

Curtis, William J. R. Modern Architecture since 1900. [London]: Phaidon, 1996. Print.

Doroski, Jordan. "Green Technology." Personal interview. 08 Jan. 2012.

"Geothermal Energy - Renewable Energy World." Renewable Energy World - Renewable Energy News, Jobs, Events, Companies, and More. Web. 25 Dec. 2012. <http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/tech/geothermal-energy>.

"Geothermal Technology, How It Works - WFI Global." WaterFurnace - Smarter from the Ground Up™. Web. 25 Dec. 2012. <http://www.wfiglobal.com/GeothermalTechnology.asp>.

"Green Buildings." Windspire Wind Turbines by Windspire Energy. Web. 25 Dec. 2012. <http://www.windspireenergy.com/applications/green-buildings/>.

"How Are Solar Panels Made?" Solar Panels. Web. Dec.-Jan. 2012. <http://www.solarpanelinfo.com/solar-panels/how-are-solar-panels-made.php>.

"Wind Technology." New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Web. 25 Dec. 2012. <http://www.nyserda.ny.gov/en/Page-Sections/Renewables/Large-Wind/Wind-Technology.aspx>.

"Wind Turbines - Kinetic Wind Energy Generator Technology." Alternative Energy News. Web. 25 Dec. 2012. <http://www.alternative-energy-news.info/technology/wind-power/wind-turbines/>.