Ross School - Senior Projects 2011

 

Student: Camille Coy

Mentor: Therese Lichtenstein

Domain(s): Visual Arts

 

Product                            

 

Title: Delicate Mutations

 

Description:

My installation piece consists of several handmade books of my artwork and writing, a mural, a large poster of a short story that I wrote, a memory box, and several smaller miscellaneous drawings, paintings and handmade books. The paintings in the larger books were done mostly with watercolor and I used a typewriter for all of the writing besides the poster. All of the sewing except for the binding of the rabbit skull book was done by hand and all of the beading was done one bead at a time, by hand.

            Most of my work was done by hand because I wanted my work to be personal and soaked in the energy and time that it took to make it, like the difference between reading an e-mail and holding a letter. I wanted my products to explore essences that cannot be expressed with words. My goal was not only to communicate my own ideas, but also to allow viewers to relate to my work and to find a piece of themselves within it.

 

Details:

 

Images (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

 

PowerPoint

 

Abstract

In Delicate Mutations I created a multimedia installation piece in which I explore my fear of the infinite and my fascination with repetition, association, and beauty. I try to express the beauty in the paranoia and anxiety that I associate with the multiplicity of human consciousness and its unceasing repetition. To combat fear or confusion, one simplifies. I reduced the infinite into a series of delicately mutated figures and concepts. Everything is subtly altered from an original form, which is in turn altered through unimaginable amounts of subdivisions until the final form is reached: an impure form that is tainted and enhanced with the traces of its past states. 

My mural is an expression of my philosophy. The mutation of the gun girl to the parasol girl and the juxtaposition of the two girls and their thirty five mutations in my mural expresses how representation, association and meaning are not fixed concepts, but flexible oneŐs that change and mutate with their context and environment. I found that a violent image such as a gun was an appropriate tool for me to use to explain this because it allowed me to use a natural and acknowledged contrast to guide the viewer to my deeper meaning.

My project consists of several dimensions: painting, sculpture, writing, and music because I found it difficult to communicate feeling through a single medium. The different mediums interact with one another to convey feeling and to attempt to guide the viewers towards a greater meaning, while still allowing the viewer to find a meaning on their own. I believe that all of the senses need to be stimulated in order for meaning to take hold and remain relevant in the clouded storm of the conscious present.

Most of my work was done by hand. I wanted my work to be personal and soaked in the energy and time that it took to make it, like the difference between reading an e-mail and holding a letter. I wanted my products to explore essences that cannot be expressed with words. My goal was not only to communicate my own ideas, but also to allow viewers to relate to my work and to find a piece of themselves within it.

Although there is no direct source that I can trace my work back to, I know that my work emerged from the exchange between my environment and various outside influences and inspirations, and my own feelings and perceptions. This exchange helped me to understand my art and myself in a new way.

My project brings elements of the past comfortably into the present because both are necessary to even begin to explore a contemporary consciousness. I wanted the footprints of history to be visible in the grounds of the present within my work.

 

Works Consulted

 

Shapton, Leanne. Was She Pretty? New York: Sarah Crichton /Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006. Print.

 

Hartigan, Lynda Roscoe., Richard Vine, Robert Lehrman, Walter Hopps, and Joseph Cornell. Joseph Cornell: Shadowplay Eterniday. New York: Thames & Hudson, 2003. Print.

 

Harris, Ruth. Modern Women. New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks, 1990. Print.

 

Murakami, Takashi. Little Boy: the Arts of Japan's Exploding Subculture. New York: Japan Society, 2005. Print.

 

Schaffner, Ingrid, Donna Ghelerter, Stamatina Gregory, Kenneth E. Silver, and Maira Kalman. Maira Kalman: Various Illuminations (of a Crazy World). Philadelphia: Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 2010. Print.

 

"Aurel Schmidt." Tinyvices.com. Web. Aug. 2010. <http://www.tinyvices.com/gallery/aurel-schmidt>.

 

Kalman, Maira. And the Pursuit of Happiness. New York: Penguin, 2010. Print.

 

Kalman, Maira. The Principles of Uncertainty. New York: Penguin, 2007. Print.

 

Burton, Tim, Ronald S. Magliozzi, and Jenny He. Tim Burton. New York, NY: Museum of Modern Art, 2009. Print.

 

 

Outside Consultant

 

Hal McKusick:

 

Hal McKusick is a professional musician and composer. He has been my flute teacher for 7 years and I have been a member of his jazz band for 3 years. Mr. McKusick helped me to prepare and record my CD which consists of 3 tracks, BourrŽe Anglaise by J.S. Bach, Summer by Hal McKusick, and Scrapple From The Apple by Charlie Parker.